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This Holiday Season Be Nice, Not Naughty: Use the Most Readable Low Vision Font

It is holiday greeting card time!

Tis the season to remember friends and family, whether across the street or across the globe. Be nice to those on your mailing list who may have low vision, and consider using a font with consistent stroke widths, open counterforms, and pronounced ascenders and descenders to make reading easier for them. Three fonts you may already be familiar with that have these features are; Century Schoolbook, Arial, and Frutiger Bold.

But an even better font option may be APHont™ (pronounced Ay’-font). It was developed by the American Printing House (APH) for the Blind, specifically for low vision readers. It embraces the features found most readable by people with low vision, and when magnified, it maintains its integrity. If you are a person with low vision, or wish to send written communication to someone who is, the entire APHont Suite is available free-of-charge from the APH.

American Printing House for the Blind's typeface APHont.
Visual Representation of the APHont alphabet and numbers
So, to increase your niceness score this season, click here to get APHont™! If you meet the criteria of a qualified user as defined by the APH, download the font and make your messages for those experiencing low vision more readable. I promise, they will thank you for it.

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4 Comments on “This Holiday Season Be Nice, Not Naughty: Use the Most Readable Low Vision Font”

  • This Holiday Season Be Nice, Not Naughty: Use the Most Readable Low Vision Font | OT's with Apps & Technology December 20th, 2014 3:29 pm

    […] As scooped with Scoopit from: IPAT Blog ” This Holiday Season be Nice not Naughty, use the Most Readable Low Vision Font&#82… […]

  • Weekend Roundup for 21 December 2014 | ATMac December 21st, 2014 4:26 am

    […] This Holiday Season Be Nice, Not Naughty: Use the Most Readable Low Vision Font [I love APHont! For … […]

  • Terri Kersting January 7th, 2015 12:36 pm

    Please explain the following terms: open counterforms, pronounced ascenders & descenders. Thanks.

  • tfloyd January 15th, 2015 11:01 am

    Hi Terri,

    These terms all relate to typography, which is the style and appearance of printed matter.
    Counter:“A counter is the area of a letter that is entirely or partially enclosed by a letter form or a symbol (the counter-space/the hole of). Letters containing closed counters include A, B, D, O, P, Q, R, a, b, d, e, g, o, p, and q. Letters containing open counters include c, f, h, i, s etc. The digits 0, 4, 6, 8, and 9 also possess a counter.” An open counterform would be a defined space in open counters.
    Ascender: “The part of a lower-case letter that is taller than the font’s x-height.” See this link for further explanation and an illustration of this term: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascender_%28typography%29
    Descender: “A descender is the portion of a letter that extends below the baseline of a font.” See this link for further explanation and an illustration of this term: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descender

    I hope this helps!